personal information – How To Occupy http://howtooccupy.org/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 19:48:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://howtooccupy.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon.png personal information – How To Occupy http://howtooccupy.org/ 32 32 3- and 5-year personal loan rates continue to fall https://howtooccupy.org/3-and-5-year-personal-loan-rates-continue-to-fall/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 19:48:41 +0000 https://howtooccupy.org/3-and-5-year-personal-loan-rates-continue-to-fall/ Our goal at Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, hereafter referred to as “Credible”, is to give you the tools and confidence you need to improve your finances. Although we promote the products of our partner lenders who pay us for our services, all opinions are our own. The latest personal loan interest rate trends […]]]>

Our goal at Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, hereafter referred to as “Credible”, is to give you the tools and confidence you need to improve your finances. Although we promote the products of our partner lenders who pay us for our services, all opinions are our own.

The latest personal loan interest rate trends from Credible Marketplace, updated weekly. (iStock)

Borrowers with a good credit application personal loans in the last seven days pre-qualified for lower rates for 3-year and 5-year fixed rates than in the previous seven days.

For borrowers with credit scores of 720 or higher who used the Credible Marketplace to select a lender between March 10 and March 16:

  • Rates on 3-year fixed-rate loans averaged 10.13%, down from 10.47% the previous seven days and 10.83% a year ago.
  • Rates on 5-year fixed-rate loans averaged 12.23%, down from 12.95% the previous seven days and 13.16% a year ago.

Personal loans have become a popular means of consolidate and pay off credit card debt and other loans. They can also be used to cover unexpected expenses like medical billstake care of a major purchase or finance home improvement projects.

3- and 5-year fixed personal loan rates have fallen over the past seven days. While the rates for 3-year terms only fell by a slight 0.34%, the rates for 5-year terms saw a more significant drop of 0.72%. Borrowers can enjoy interest savings with a 3 or 5 year personal loan now.

Whether a personal loan is right for you often depends on several factors, including the rate you may qualify for. Comparing several lenders and their rates could help you get the best possible personal loan for your needs.

It’s always a good idea to comparison store on sites like Credible to understand how much you qualify for and choose the best option for you.

Here are the latest personal loan interest rate trends from the Credible Marketplace, updated monthly.

Personal Loan Weekly Rate Trends

The table above shows the average prequalified rates for borrowers with credit scores of 720 or higher who used the Credible Marketplace to select a lender.

For the month of February 2022:

  • 3-year personal loan rates averaged 10.52%, down from 11.09% in January.
  • 5-year personal loan rates averaged 12.99%, down from 13.40% in January.

Personal loan rates vary widely depending on credit rating and length of loan. If you’re curious about what kind of personal loan rates you might qualify for, you can use an online tool like Credible to compare the options of different private lenders. Checking your rates will not affect your credit score.

All Credible Marketplace lenders offer fixed rate loans at competitive rates. Since lenders use different methods to assess borrowers, it’s a good idea to ask for personal loan rates from multiple lenders so you can compare your options.

Current personal loan rates by credit score

In February, the average prequalified rate retained by borrowers was:

  • 8.32% for borrowers with credit scores of 780 or higher choosing a 3-year loan
  • 29.42% for borrowers with credit scores below 600 choosing a 5-year loan

Depending on factors such as your credit score, the type of personal loan you are looking for, and the repayment term of the loan, the interest rate may differ.

As the chart above shows, a good credit rating can mean a lower interest rate, and rates tend to be higher on loans with fixed interest rates and longer repayment terms.

How to get a lower interest rate

Many factors influence the interest rate a lender can offer you for a personal loan. But there are steps you can take to increase your chances of getting a lower interest rate. Here are some tactics to try.

Increase credit score

Generally, people with higher credit scores qualify for lower interest rates. Steps that can help you improve your credit score over time include:

  • Pay your bills on time. Payment history is the most important factor in your credit score. Pay all your bills on time for the amount owed.
  • Check your credit report. Check your credit file to make sure there are no errors. If you find any errors, dispute them with the credit bureau.
  • Reduce your credit utilization rate. Paying off credit card debt can improve this important credit score factor.
  • Avoid opening new credit accounts. Apply for and open only the credit accounts you really need. Too many serious inquiries on your credit report in a short time could lower your credit score.

Choose a shorter loan term

Personal loan repayment terms can vary from one to several years. Typically, shorter terms come with lower interest rates because the lender’s money is at risk for a shorter period.

If your financial situation allows it, applying for a shorter term could help you get a lower interest rate. Keep in mind that the shorter term doesn’t just benefit the lender: by choosing a shorter repayment term, you’ll pay less interest over the life of the loan.

Get a co-signer

You may be familiar with the concept of a co-signer if you have student loans. If your credit isn’t good enough to qualify for the best personal loan interest rates, find a co-signer with good credit could help you get a lower interest rate.

Remember that if you are unable to repay the loan, your co-signer will have to repay it. And co-signing a loan could also affect their credit score.

Compare rates from different lenders

Before applying for a personal loan, it’s a good idea to shop around and compare offers from several different lenders to get the lowest rates. Online lenders generally offer the most competitive rates and can be quicker to disburse your loan than a physical establishment.

But don’t worry, comparing rates and terms doesn’t have to be a tedious process.

Credible is easy. Simply enter the amount you wish to borrow and you can compare multiple lenders to choose the one that suits you best.

About Credible

Credible is a multi-lender marketplace that allows consumers to discover the financial products best suited to their particular situation. Credible’s integrations with major lenders and credit bureaus allow consumers to quickly compare accurate and personalized loan options without putting their personal information at risk or affecting their credit score. The Credible Marketplace delivers an unparalleled customer experience, as evidenced by over 4,500 positive Trustpilot reviews and a TrustScore of 4.7/5.

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Data Breach Alert: Lake Shore Savings Bank | Console and Associates, PC https://howtooccupy.org/data-breach-alert-lake-shore-savings-bank-console-and-associates-pc/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 17:21:52 +0000 https://howtooccupy.org/data-breach-alert-lake-shore-savings-bank-console-and-associates-pc/ Recently, Lake Shore Savings Bank confirmed that the company had suffered a data security incident leading to the compromise of the names, addresses and bank account numbers of certain customers. If you have received a data breach notification, it is essential that you understand what is at risk. the data breach lawyers at Console & […]]]>

Recently, Lake Shore Savings Bank confirmed that the company had suffered a data security incident leading to the compromise of the names, addresses and bank account numbers of certain customers. If you have received a data breach notification, it is essential that you understand what is at risk. the data breach lawyers at Console & Associates, PC is actively investigating the Lake Shore Savings Bank data breach on behalf of those whose information was exposed. As part of this investigation, we are offering free consultations to anyone affected by the breach who wants to learn more about the risks of identity theft, what they can do to protect themselves, and what their legal options may be. get compensation from Lake Shore Savings Bank.

Last year, 1,862 data breaches affected more than 189 million people. On average, victims of identity theft spend 200 hours and over $1,300 trying to find their identity. Many victims also suffer from emotional distress, credit damage, and may even end up with a criminal record. Taking immediate action is the best way to prevent the worst consequences of a data breach.

Learn more about the causes and risks of data breaches

Often, data breaches result from a hacker gaining unauthorized access to a company’s computer systems in an effort to obtain sensitive consumer information. Although no one can know why a hacker targeted Lake Shore Savings, it is common for hackers and other criminals to identify companies suspected of having weak data security systems or vulnerabilities in their networks.

Once a cybercriminal gains access to a computer network, they can then access and delete all data stored on compromised servers. While in most cases a business victim of a data breach can identify the accessed files, they may have no way of knowing which files the hacker actually accessed or deleted. Datas.

Although the fact that your information has been compromised in a data breach does not necessarily mean that it will be used for criminal purposes, being the victim of a data breach puts your sensitive data in the hands of someone unauthorized. Therefore, you are at increased risk of identity theft and other fraud, and criminal use of your information is a possibility that should not be ignored.

Given this reality, individuals who receive a data breach notification from Lake Shore Savings Bank should take the situation seriously and remain vigilant by checking for any signs of unauthorized activity. Companies like Lake Shore Savings are responsible for protecting consumer data in their possession. If Lake Shore Savings Bank is found to have failed to adequately protect your sensitive information, you may be eligible for financial compensation through a data breach lawsuit.

What are consumer remedies following the Lake Shore Savings Bank data breach?

When customers decided to do business with Lake Shore Savings, they assumed the company would take their privacy concerns seriously. And it goes without saying that consumers would think twice about giving a company access to their information if they knew it wouldn’t be secure. Thus, data breaches such as this raise questions about the adequacy of a company’s data security system.

When a business, government entity, nonprofit, school, or other organization accepts and stores consumer data, it also accepts a legal obligation to ensure that this information is kept private. US data breach laws allow consumers to pursue civil data breach claims against organizations that fail to protect their information.

Of course, given the recentness of the Lake Shore Savings Bank data breach, the investigation into the incident is still in its early stages. And, at this time, there is no evidence yet to suggest that Lake Shore Savings is legally liable for the breach. However, that may change as more information about the breach and its causes comes to light.

If you have questions about your ability to bring a data breach class action lawsuit against zLake Shore Savings Bank, contact a data breach attorney as soon as possible.

What should you do if you receive a data breach notification from Lake Shore Savings Bank?

If Lake Shore Savings Bank sends you a data breach notification letter, you are among those whose information was compromised in the recent breach. Although this is not the time to panic, the situation deserves your attention. Below are some important steps you can take to protect yourself against identity theft and other fraudulent activity:

  1. Identify compromised information: The first thing to do after becoming aware of a data breach is to carefully review the data breach letter sent. The letter will tell you what information about you was accessible to the unauthorized party. Be sure to make a copy of the letter and keep it for your records. If you’re having trouble understanding the letter or what steps you can take to protect yourself, a data breach attorney can help.

  2. Limit future access to your accounts: Once you’ve determined what information about you was affected by the breach, the safest game is to assume that the hacker who orchestrated the attack stole your data. Although this is not the case, prevention is better than cure. To prevent future access to your accounts, you must change all passwords and security questions for any online account. This includes online banking accounts, credit card accounts, online shopping accounts, and any other accounts that contain your personal information. You should also consider changing your social media account passwords and setting up multi-factor authentication where available.

  3. Protect your credit and financial accounts: After a data breach, companies often provide affected parties with free credit monitoring services. Signing up for free credit monitoring offers important protections and does not affect any of your rights to bring a data breach lawsuit against the company if it is found to be legally responsible for the violation. You should contact a credit bureau to request a copy of your credit file, even if you notice no signs of fraud or unauthorized activity. Adding a fraud alert to your account will provide you with additional protection.

  4. Consider implementing a credit freeze: A credit freeze prevents anyone from accessing your credit report. Credit freezes are free and remain in effect until you remove them. Once a credit freeze is in place, you can temporarily lift it if you need to apply for any type of credit. While freezing credit on your accounts may seem like overkill, given the risks involved, it’s warranted. According to the Identity Theft Resource Center (“ITRC”), freezing credit on your account is “the most effective way to prevent a new credit/financial account from being opened.” However, only 3% of data breach victims freeze their accounts.

  5. Monitor your credit report and financial accounts regularly: Protecting yourself following a data breach requires continuous effort on your part. You should regularly check your credit report and all financial account statements for any signs of unauthorized activity or fraud. You should also call your banks and credit card companies to report that your information has been compromised in a data breach.

Below is the portion of the data breach notification sent by Lake Shore Savings Bank:

Expensive ,

The purpose of this letter is to notify you of a data security incident experienced by Lake Shore Savings Bank which may have involved your personal information, and, as a precaution, we are providing information on steps you can take to help protect your information. We take the privacy and security of your personal information very seriously and sincerely regret any concerns this incident may cause you.

What happened? On November 24, 2021, Lake Shore Savings Bank experienced a data security incident that prevented employees from accessing internal systems and data. Upon discovering this incident, Lake Shore Savings Bank immediately launched an investigation and hired a digital forensics firm to help determine what happened and what information may have been accessed. The Lake Shore Savings Bank also notified the FBI and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency of the incident. During its investigation, Lake Shore Savings Bank identified unauthorized access to certain data in its systems. Although there is no evidence that your personal information has been misused, out of an abundance of caution, we are notifying you of the incident and providing information on steps you can take to protect your information.

The incident did not involve access to any Lake Shore Savings Bank account, and there is no evidence of unauthorized or suspicious activity in your Lake Shore Savings Bank account(s).

What information was involved? The information may include your name, address and bank account number.

What do we do? As soon as we discovered this incident, we took the measures described above. We have also implemented additional safeguards to help keep our network secure to reduce the risk of a similar event occurring in the future.

Plus, we offer identity theft protection services through IDX, the data breach and recovery expert. IDX Identity Protection Services include:< 12 mois/24 mois>> credit monitoring and CyberScan, a $1,000,000 insurance reimbursement policy and fully managed identity theft recovery services. With this protection, IDX will help you resolve issues if your identity is compromised.

What you can do: We encourage you to sign up for free identity protection services by calling 1-800-939-4170 or by visiting http://app.idx.us/account-creation/protect and using the registration code provided above. Please note that the registration deadline is June 7, 2022.

Please call 1-800-939-4170 or go to http://app.idx.us/account-creation/protect for help or any other questions you may have.

For more information: More information on how to protect your information appears on the next page. If you have any questions regarding this incident, please contact 1-800-939-4170, Monday through Friday (excluding holidays), 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Eastern Time.

Please accept our sincere apologies and know that we deeply regret any concern or inconvenience this may cause you. Thank you for your continued trust and support.

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Surviving a motion to dismiss in a data breach case https://howtooccupy.org/surviving-a-motion-to-dismiss-in-a-data-breach-case/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 16:27:16 +0000 https://howtooccupy.org/surviving-a-motion-to-dismiss-in-a-data-breach-case/ by Dennis Crouch Coffey vs. OK Foods2:21-CV-02200, 2022 WL 738072 (WD Ark. Mar. 10, 2022) Coffey applied for a job at major poultry producer OK Foods (owned by Bachoco). The online application required him to provide substantial personally identifiable information (PII), including his name, SSN, date of birth, etc. She got the job. At some […]]]>

by Dennis Crouch

Coffey vs. OK Foods2:21-CV-02200, 2022 WL 738072 (WD Ark. Mar. 10, 2022)

Coffey applied for a job at major poultry producer OK Foods (owned by Bachoco). The online application required him to provide substantial personally identifiable information (PII), including his name, SSN, date of birth, etc. She got the job. At some point a few years later, OK Foods’ computer system was hacked and Coffey’s information was exposed (along with that of thousands of other employees). Coffey discovered this after being notified of the violation (as required by law).

Coffey sued OK Foods, filing a class action for negligence, breach of implied contract, breach of trust, invasion of privacy, breach of fiduciary duty, and breach of covenant of good faith and fair use.

Concrete injury for data breach: Coffey’s stock suffers from the same problems seen in most cases of hacking of important personal information – concrete damages. Here, Coffey maintains that she is now suffering from a increased risk of future identity theft. The defendant pointed the district court to the 2021 decision in TransUnion LLC vs. Ramirez, 141 S.Ct. 2190 (2021). In Trans Unionthe Supreme Court held that the “mere risk of future harm” regarding a credit alert was not sufficiently concrete to meet constitutional requirements.

OK Foods sought dismissal for lack of standing, but the district court found that the future risk of the allegations in this case was substantial and concrete enough to survive a motion to dismiss. the tribunal de grande instance has particularly distinguished itself Trans Union. In this case, there was no evidence that the information had been disseminated to third parties. On the other hand, in the case of Coffee, everyone agrees that Coffee’s PII was obtained by a third party. Coffee also provided evidence of recent unknown credit inquiries on its credit report. For the district court, this configuration was sufficient to demonstrate standing. The decision here is at dawn and other courts would have rejected it. Cases are more likely to proceed when the breach includes financial or account login information such as user IDs and passwords.

Arbitration Agreement in Job Application: When Coffee applied for the job, she also clicked “I accept” for a set of terms that included an arbitration agreement. She argued, however, that the agreement is not enforceable because she was not provided with a copy of the agreement to review and she does not recall ever signing the agreement. The District Court noted two issues with OK Foods’ evidence presented thus far: (1) OK Foods did not present the “exact materials” as they appeared on the screen here during the process of 2016 request; and (2) the download link provided does not show the arbitration package. Additionally, evidence from OK Foods shows that a digitally signed arbitration agreement is dated May 3, 2016, while the plaintiff alleges that she completed her application online in April 2016.

All of these competing allegations and evidence create a question of material fact and therefore the District Court declined to force arbitration at this stage.

Next steps if:

  • Jury Trial on whether the parties have entered into a binding arbitration agreement. 9 USC § 4. Note here that jury trials on arbitrability are rarely granted. Rather, the usual approach is for the district court to decide arbitrability based on a standard of summary judgment. Here, however, the court determined that the competing evidence created a sufficient dispute.
  • If there is no arb, then a trial on plaintiff’s claims (although D will likely try to pre-empt this via summary judgment).
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In Recognition of National Consumer Protection Week, Attorney General Bonta Highlights Consumer Resources and ACJDO Priorities | State of California – Department of Justice https://howtooccupy.org/in-recognition-of-national-consumer-protection-week-attorney-general-bonta-highlights-consumer-resources-and-acjdo-priorities-state-of-california-department-of-justice/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 15:13:51 +0000 https://howtooccupy.org/in-recognition-of-national-consumer-protection-week-attorney-general-bonta-highlights-consumer-resources-and-acjdo-priorities-state-of-california-department-of-justice/ Urges consumers to report violations of law to the California Department of Justice at oag.ca.gov/report OAKLAND – In recognition of National Consumer Protection Week, California attorney Rob Bonta today highlighted ongoing efforts to protect California consumers and urged consumers to report misconduct or violations of privacy laws. state consumers to the California Department of Justice […]]]>

Urges consumers to report violations of law to the California Department of Justice at oag.ca.gov/report

OAKLAND – In recognition of National Consumer Protection Week, California attorney Rob Bonta today highlighted ongoing efforts to protect California consumers and urged consumers to report misconduct or violations of privacy laws. state consumers to the California Department of Justice (DOJ) at oag.ca.gov/report. Complaints filed by the public play a vital role in the Attorney General’s consumer protection efforts by providing DOJ with important information about potential wrongdoing to help determine whether a company or individual should be investigated. Enforcement priorities at the DOJ include housing, debt collection, data privacy, higher education, and consumer lending.

“Many in California are buried under a mountain of debt: whether it’s student loans, credit card debt, mortgage payments, or all of the above,” Attorney General Bonta said. “In California, we have strong consumer protection laws, but unfortunately there are still those who seek to take advantage of them. Our team works around the clock to protect consumers and hold bad actors accountable, but we have need your help.If you have been exploited by a predatory lender, are facing abusive debt collection practices, have been unlawfully evicted, or have information about other violations of the law, please file a complaint with my office.The leads we get from the public help us identify where companies are trying to circumvent the law – and help us hold companies accountable.

LODGING: California is facing a housing shortage and affordability crisis of epic proportions. In November, Attorney General Bonta announced the creation of a housing strike force within the California Department of Justice and launched a housing portal on the DOJ website with resources and information for landlords. and California tenants.

The Housing Strike Force encourages Californians to send housing-related complaints or advice to housing@doj.ca.gov. The Housing Strike Force is particularly interested in advice relating to illegal evictions and rent increases, housing discrimination, and the origination and servicing of mortgages. Information about legal aid in your area is available at www.lawhelpca.org.

DEBT RECOVERY: State law protects Californians from abusive, unfair, or deceptive debt collection practices. Attorney General Bonta is urging Californians who receive a notice from a debt collector to respond as soon as possible, even if they don’t owe the debt. If you don’t, the collector may continue to try to collect the debt, report negative information to credit reporting companies, and even sue you.

Collection agents may not contact you repeatedly over a short period of time to annoy or harass you, make false or misleading statements, or contact you at unusual or inconvenient times or places. If you think a debt collector is breaking the law, you can file a complaint at oag.ca.gov/report. For more information on debt collection, go to oag.ca.gov/consumers/general/debt-collectors.

DATA PRIVACY: The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) grants consumers groundbreaking rights over their personal information, including:

  • The right to know – Consumers can ask a company to tell them what specific personal information they have collected, shared or sold about them, and why it was collected, shared or sold.
  • Right to deletion — Consumers can ask a business to delete the personal information it has collected from the consumer, subject to certain exceptions.
  • Right of withdrawal — If a business sells its personal information, consumers can ask that it stop doing so.
  • Rights of minors — A company cannot sell the personal information of minors under 16 without their permission and, for children under 13, without parental consent.
  • Right to non-discrimination — A company cannot discriminate against consumers who exercise their rights under the CCPA.

For more information about the CCPA, visit oag.ca.gov/ccpa. To report a CCPA violation to the Attorney General, submit a complaint at oag.ca.gov/report. You can also use the Consumer Privacy Tool to directly notify businesses that don’t have a clear, easy-to-find “Do Not Sell My Personal Information” link on their homepage.

HIGHER EDUCATION: There is a $1.7 trillion student debt crisis in the United States, and the DOJ is committed to holding bad actors accountable for defrauding California students. If you believe you have been the victim of predatory lending, deceived by a for-profit college, or otherwise exploited, you can file a complaint with our office at oag.ca.gov/report.

California students can also take advantage of recent developments resulting from the work of the DOJ. In January, Attorney General Bonta announced a settlement with student loan manager Navient to resolve allegations of misconduct in the servicing and collection of federal student loans. Californians do not need to take any action to receive the benefits required under the settlement. More information about the settlement is available at www.NavientAGSettlement.com.

After years of effort by state attorneys general and others, the Biden administration recently announced a sweeping overhaul of the broken Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) and Temporary Public Service Loan Forgiveness programs. the extended public service (TEPSLF). Attorney General Bonta encourages Californians working in the government or nonprofit sector to take advantage of the Department of Education’s limited public service loan waiver waiver opportunity to receive credit for past payments made on loans that would otherwise not qualify under the PSLF program. Borrowers requesting loan forgiveness under the recent changes must take action by October 31, 2022.

READY FOR CONSUMPTION: Attorney General Bonta pledged to protect vulnerable California borrowers from predatory lenders and others who seek to take advantage. To that end, the Attorney General is urging Californians to report predatory lenders at oag.ca.gov/report.

Californians should also try to avoid certain loans when possible. To avoid getting stuck in a debt trap, avoid payday loans if you can. Payday loans can turn a short-term need for emergency cash into a long-term, unaffordable cycle of high-interest loans you can’t repay. In California, payday lenders can lend up to $300 and charge a maximum of $45 in fees. Although these fees do not seem too high, the average annual rate of payday loans is 372%. This is a much higher rate than most other loans or credit cards. You can contact the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation to verify a payday lender’s license, history of disciplinary action against a payday lender, or to file a complaint. You can also file a complaint with our office.

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Washingtonians impacted by 2021 T-Mobile data breach – Dailyfly.com Lewis-Clark Valley Community https://howtooccupy.org/washingtonians-impacted-by-2021-t-mobile-data-breach-dailyfly-com-lewis-clark-valley-community/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 22:05:49 +0000 https://howtooccupy.org/washingtonians-impacted-by-2021-t-mobile-data-breach-dailyfly-com-lewis-clark-valley-community/ Washington State Attorney General’s Office OLYMPIA — Attorney General Bob Ferguson urges all Washingtonians who believe they were affected by the data breach announced by T-Mobile in August 2021 to take appropriate steps to protect their personal information […]]]>












Washington State Attorney General’s Office




OLYMPIA — Attorney General Bob Ferguson urges all Washingtonians who believe they were affected by the data breach announced by T-Mobile in August 2021 to take appropriate steps to protect their personal information from identity theft.

The data breach affected approximately 2 million Washingtonians.

“Data breaches continue to be a growing threat to Washingtonians,” Ferguson said. “We want to make sure Washingtonians have the tools they need to protect themselves in the wake of a data breach.”

On August 17, 2021, T-Mobile reported a massive data breach compromising the sensitive personal information of millions of current, former and potential T-Mobile customers. The breach affected more than 50 million people nationwide. Millions of people have had their names, dates of birth, social security numbers and driver’s license information compromised.

Recently, a large subset of the information compromised in the breach was for sale on the “dark web” – a hidden part of the internet where cybercriminals buy, sell and track personal information. Many people have since received alerts through various identity theft protection services advising them that their information has been found online in connection with the breach, confirming that those affected are at increased risk of identity theft.

Ferguson urges anyone who believes they were part of the August 2021 T-Mobile data breach to take the following steps to protect themselves:

  • Watch your credit. Credit monitoring services track your credit report and alert you whenever a change is made, such as a new account or a large purchase. Most services will notify you within 24 hours of any changes to your credit report.
  • Consider placing a free credit freeze on your credit report. Identity thieves will not be able to open a new credit account in your name while the freeze is in place. You can place a credit freeze by contacting each of the three major credit bureaus:
  • Place a fraud alert on your credit report. A fraud alert tells lenders and creditors to take extra steps to verify your identity before issuing credit. You can place a fraud alert by contacting any of the three major credit bureaus.
  • Additional Resources. If you think you’ve been the victim of identity theft, go to voldidentite.gov for help on how to report it and recover from it. Washingtonians can also visit https://www.atg.wa.gov/guardit.aspx for more information.









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Caught up in the big buy now, pay later https://howtooccupy.org/caught-up-in-the-big-buy-now-pay-later/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 06:51:00 +0000 https://howtooccupy.org/caught-up-in-the-big-buy-now-pay-later/ So I made a big mistake. My father passed away last September and my sisters and I are in the process of selling his house. The realtor was pushing for ID, and I helpfully — and very stupidly — emailed him a photo of my driver’s license. This is where my real problems started. Armed […]]]>

So I made a big mistake. My father passed away last September and my sisters and I are in the process of selling his house. The realtor was pushing for ID, and I helpfully — and very stupidly — emailed him a photo of my driver’s license.

This is where my real problems started. Armed with a credit card and a driver’s license, the criminals set up a series of “Buy Now, Pay Later” accounts in my name.

And then I started getting emails from vendors buy now, pay later – ahem, Openpay and LatitudePay, to be specific.

LatitudePay notified me of a request to reset my password so I tried to speak to their call center to let them know there must be some fraudulent activity as I didn’t even have account with them, let alone a password.

I asked to be introduced to the fraud department, but in a decidedly Kafkaesque gesture, the person I was talking to refused to do so unless I provided more personal details.

After providing a few more details, I began to feel extremely uncomfortable giving personal information over the phone, given that I had been scammed so recently.

Humm was a frequent communicator, sending a series of cheery emails letting me know that I had been approved for $1,000 credit and my credit card details had changed.

I wisely ignored them all, assuming they were part of an elaborate phishing scam.

But my anxiety started to mount last week as messages from Openpay grew more insistent. It started with a payment reminder for a purchase at Officeworks on Wednesday. I received a notification that the $99.40 payment was missed.

Last Friday I called humm and spoke to an extremely efficient person at their call center who told me that humm had my (correct) driver’s license details. Oddly, the criminals had replaced my original credit card details with those of two other cards – presumably also stolen – and paid off the original loan which was just under $1,000 ahead of schedule.

(A banker later explained that criminals use this tactic to improve their credit history so they can apply for larger loans.)

The humm employee happily informed me that because there was no money to pay, my credit rating would not be affected.

But she advised me to report the fraud to the police – which I did immediately – and get a new driver’s license.

I also contacted Openpay to report the fraud, but unfortunately the call center person did not give me details of the amount borrowed from my account as the account was now locked.

I found myself at the Rose Bay police station with a very friendly young officer as we considered how best to comply with Openpay’s request.

Openpay referred the matter to the fraud department, and I received an email – “Unfortunately, you may have been the victim of fraud” – which told me what steps I needed to take “to resolve this issue and clear your credit report“.

And although the account is now locked, I received a second late payment notice from Openpay early Saturday morning, which urged me to “make your payment as soon as possible, otherwise you may be subject to a Debt recovery”.

So Saturday afternoon I found myself at the Rose Bay police station with a very friendly young officer as we considered how best to comply with Openpay’s request for a police report or statutory declaration , which had to be attested by a member of the police force.

The policeman was extremely sympathetic, but not optimistic about the chances of locating the criminals who, he explained, were probably based abroad.

I was in a slightly agitated state. Shortly before going to the police station, I received an email from LatitudePay – “an exciting way to shop, packed with benefits”.

So, with the cop looking over my shoulder, I emailed them back telling them I was a victim of identity theft and asking them to block my account.

On Monday, I was disturbed to find out that the scammers had been approved for a $4,000 loan from LatitudePay, which they hadn’t used, which is remarkable.

Unsurprisingly, the cell phone number the scammers gave LatitudePay was the same one provided to humm. (Not mine, needless to say.)

LatitudePay’s fraud department was also very helpful in advising me to contact a credit bureau and get a copy of my credit file, and alerting them that I had been the victim of fraud.

There was also a major breakthrough on Monday when Openpay’s customer support team called to discuss my case, and I found out that thankfully Openpay had been very careful and only moved forward to criminals than the grand total of $497.

Openpay’s advice mirrored LatitudePay’s: get a new driver’s license, close my hotmail account, and most importantly, I should contact a credit bureau, ask them for my credit report, and ask them to block any further requests for credit.

Because, as the Openpay representative helpfully pointed out, it is by no means certain that the criminals limited themselves to requesting loans from humm, LatitudePay and Openpay.

I may have other loans outstanding with other operators buy now, pay later – or even other creditors – who are less communicative than this trio. If other creditors have filed an inquiry into my credit rating, that’s an indication that I’m even more deeply entangled in this dark financial nightmare.

Of course, one of the most disheartening aspects of this whole experience has been the abysmal asymmetry between how easily one can secure a purchase now, pay off a loan later, and the arduous and time-consuming process of sorting out their net.

The “frictionless” process to set up a buy it now, pay later only requires someone to provide a credit card number and some form of identification, such as a driver’s license, online. It’s no surprise, then, that businesses, consumers and banks nationwide – and buy now, pay later the operators themselves – lose billions of dollars each year to financial fraud.

As Dion Appel, Openpay’s Managing Director for Australia and New Zealand, put it The Australian Financial Review“Online identity verification is not unique to buy now, pay later and has been adopted by most industries that require some form of identification, with the practice now common in financial services, telecommunications and beyond”.

“Openpay, like other buy-it-now, pay-later providers, is not alone in being targets of fraud and has complex fraud detection and transaction monitoring processes in place.”

Of course, there are other options for fraud. A fortnight ago I received an email from Coinbase – the online platform for buying and selling cryptocurrency – informing me of their planned security upgrade and asking me to update the system. And just this morning, Coinbase support contacted me about another account I created “with the same information as our rules (sic)”.

For now, I’m guessing this is a phishing exercise, given that I’m even less likely to go after cryptocurrency than buy now, pay later. But I’ve made that mistake before.

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Over 200 pieces of mail stolen in Powell Butte PO burglary found abandoned near Oakridge https://howtooccupy.org/over-200-pieces-of-mail-stolen-in-powell-butte-po-burglary-found-abandoned-near-oakridge/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 02:20:25 +0000 https://howtooccupy.org/over-200-pieces-of-mail-stolen-in-powell-butte-po-burglary-found-abandoned-near-oakridge/ POWELL BUTTE, Ore. (KTVZ) – More than 200 pieces of mail stolen in a recent burglary at the Powell Butte Post Office have been found dumped in a rural area near State Route 58 just east of Oakridge , according to Crook County Sheriff’s Deputies. The Sheriff’s Office and the U.S. Postal Service investigated a […]]]>

POWELL BUTTE, Ore. (KTVZ) – More than 200 pieces of mail stolen in a recent burglary at the Powell Butte Post Office have been found dumped in a rural area near State Route 58 just east of Oakridge , according to Crook County Sheriff’s Deputies.

The Sheriff’s Office and the U.S. Postal Service investigated a Jan. 16 burglary at the Powell Butte facility, where numerous mail and packages were stolen.

Ten days later and 120 miles away, the sheriff’s office responded Wednesday to a citizen’s report of mail found in the area off Highway 58 and recovered more than 200 pieces of mail taken during break-ins in many post office boxes.

Deputies said several of the postal items recovered contained personal information, putting the intended recipients at risk of identity theft.

They offered this advice in a Facebook post:

The Crook County Sheriff’s Office strongly encourages everyone involved to keep a close watch on:

• Accounts and bank statements

• Credit card accounts and statements

• Explanation of the medical benefits of individual health plans

If your identity is stolen, it is recommended that you take immediate action to avoid any loss.

Call one of the national credit reporting companies and request that a 90-day fraud alert be placed on your records:

Equifax 1-800-525-6285

Experian 1-888-397-3742

Trans Union 1-800-680-7289

Order your credit report and look for any suspicious activity.

Create an identity theft report

File a complaint with the FTC at ftc.gov/complaint or 1-800-877-438-4338

Contact the Crook County Sheriff’s Office at 541-447-6398 to file a police report.

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Data Breach Alert: LendUs, LLC | Console and Associates, PC https://howtooccupy.org/data-breach-alert-lendus-llc-console-and-associates-pc/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 01:35:50 +0000 https://howtooccupy.org/data-breach-alert-lendus-llc-console-and-associates-pc/ In recent news, the mortgage company, LendUS, LLC announced that it has experienced a data security event affecting the personal information of more than 12,000 people. Last year, LendUS, LLC learned that several company employee email accounts had been compromised. Although the details of how an unauthorized party gained access to the employees’ email accounts […]]]>

In recent news, the mortgage company, LendUS, LLC announced that it has experienced a data security event affecting the personal information of more than 12,000 people. Last year, LendUS, LLC learned that several company employee email accounts had been compromised. Although the details of how an unauthorized party gained access to the employees’ email accounts have not yet been released, thanks to a subsequent investigation, the company determined that the names and social security numbers of thousands of customers were contained in various emails and attachments.

A data breach occurs when a hacker or other criminal actor secretly gains access to sensitive consumer information stored on a company’s servers. Often, hackers target organizations that they know rely on outdated or inadequate data security measures. Hackers will often personally use the information obtained through a cyberattack to commit identity theft. However, it is also common for a hacker to sell the data to the highest bidder.

Victims of a data breach are at increased risk of identity theft, although they may not immediately notice suspicious activity. However, given the risks, it is imperative that the parties involved take all necessary steps to protect themselves against identity theft and other potentially significant financial loss.

Anyone receiving a data breach letter from LendUS, LLC has good reason to be concerned. Recently, the number of identity theft crimes has increased dramatically. In many cases, the information needed to steal another’s identity has been obtained through a data breach like this.

Businesses have an obligation to protect consumer data, and if it appears that LendUS, LLC mishandled your data prior to the data breach, you may be eligible for financial compensation through a breach lawsuit. of data.

Can consumers affected by the violation hold LendUS, LLC financially liable?

When you applied for a loan through LendUS, LLC, you provided the company with your personal information. By doing so, you trusted that the company would take your privacy seriously. Surely you assumed that they would take all necessary measures to prevent your sensitive financial and personal identifying information from ending up in the hands of a criminal. However, the LendUS, LLC data breach raises serious questions about the company’s data security measures in place at the time of the breach.

All companies, including LendUS, LLC, have an ethical and legal duty to protect the personal, identifying, financial, and health information of consumers in their possession. Although developing a robust and up-to-date data security system entails additional expense, it is only a cost of doing business in an environment where cyberattacks are common. If a company fails to protect sensitive consumer information, it can be held liable through a data breach class action lawsuit. Of course, data breach laws are complex, news of this data breach is very recent and, unsurprisingly, there is no evidence yet that LendUS, LLC has been negligent in the way it has processed consumer data. However, our data breach lawyers are actively investigating the breach to determine what legal remedies, if any, the affected parties have against LendUS, LLC

If you have questions about your ability to bring a class action lawsuit against LendUS, LLC, it is important that you contact a data breach attorney as soon as possible.

What to do if LendUS, LLC sent you a data breach notification

If you receive a data breach notification from LendUS, LLC in the mail, it means that an unauthorized person may have accessed, viewed, and retained your sensitive personal information. While it’s impossible to say why someone sought your information and what they might do with it, given the risks involved, it’s important that you give the situation the attention it deserves.

Below are some steps you can take to protect yourself against identity theft and other possible financial risks that such a data breach presents:

  • Read the LendUS, LLC data breach letter carefully to determine what information about you was accessible;
  • Make a copy of the letter for your records;
  • Sign up for the free credit monitoring service provided by LendUS, LLC;
  • Change all your passwords and security questions for all online accounts;
  • Enable two-factor authentication, where available;
  • Regularly review your credit card and bank account statements for any signs of suspicious activity;
  • Monitor your credit report for any unexpected changes that could be a sign of identity theft;
  • Contact one of the major credit bureaus to ask them to add a fraud alert to your profile; and
  • Notify your banks and credit card companies of the data breach.

About LendUS, LLC

LendUS, LLC is a mortgage company based in Alamo, California. The company is the result of a merger between two other mortgage companies, RPM Mortgage and American Eagle Mortgage. LendUS, LLC markets itself as an “ultra-attentive” manager and offers a range of residential mortgage products.

According to the most recent data available, LendUS, LLC has approximately 720 employees and generates approximately $80 million in sales.

LendUS, LLC Consumer Data Breach Details

According to the latest press release issued by LendUS, LLC, in early 2021 the company became aware of unusual activity on the email accounts of several employees. In response, LendUS, LLC secured the affected email accounts and initiated an investigation. The investigation revealed that an unauthorized party accessed certain email accounts at various times between February 2, 2021 and March 22, 2021. Although LendUS, LLC was unable to determine which emails or attachments had been viewed, the company determined that the email accounts contained the names and social security numbers of 12,205 people.

LendUS, LLC notes that there is no indication that the unauthorized party has used or intends to use any of the data obtained. On January 19, the company began sending data breach notifications to all affected parties, informing them of the breach and what they can do to protect themselves.

Below is a copy of the original data breach letter issued by LendUS, LLC (the actual notice sent to consumers can be found here):

Dear [Consumer],

LendUS, LLC (“LendUS”) understands the importance of protecting the personal information we maintain. I am writing to inform you of an incident involving some of your personal information. This notice explains the incident, the actions we have taken, and some actions you may consider taking in response.

We have investigated unauthorized access to certain LendUS employee email accounts. Upon learning of the activity, we immediately took action to secure the email accounts and launched an investigation with the assistance of a cybersecurity firm. The investigation determined that an unauthorized person accessed certain accounts at various times between February 2, 2021 and March 22, 2021. The investigation was unable to determine whether emails or exhibits attached accounts had been viewed or downloaded by the unauthorized person; however, we were unable to rule out this possibility. Out of an abundance of caution, we reviewed emails and attachments that could have been viewed or downloaded, and on December 21, 2021, we determined that an email or attachment contained your <>.

We wanted to let you know about this incident and assure you that we are taking it very seriously. We encourage you to remain vigilant by reviewing your account statements and credit reports for any unauthorized activity. If you see any charges or activities that you did not authorize, please contact the financial institution or credit bureau immediately. As an added precaution, we’re giving you a free one-year membership to Equifax CompleteTM Premier, including credit monitoring and fraud alerts. For more information on Identity Theft Prevention and Equifax CompleteTM Premier, including instructions on how to activate your free one-year subscription, please see the pages that follow this letter.

Your trust is important to us, and we regret any inconvenience or concern this incident may cause. To prevent such a situation from happening again, we have implemented additional technical protection and security measures to further improve the security of our IT systems and offer additional security awareness training for our staff. If you have any questions, please call 855-604-1753, Monday through Friday, 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Pacific Time.

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Reghan Winkler: Top 5 scams in the Lima region in 2021 https://howtooccupy.org/reghan-winkler-top-5-scams-in-the-lima-region-in-2021/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 15:30:27 +0000 https://howtooccupy.org/reghan-winkler-top-5-scams-in-the-lima-region-in-2021/ [ad_1] In an interconnected world dependent on the Internet, the methods and reasons used by fraudsters to deceive people are constantly changing. Scammers monitor the news to take advantage of the chaos and current information that can be effective in convincing people to part with their money or vital information. The COVID pandemic, widespread unemployment, […]]]>


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In an interconnected world dependent on the Internet, the methods and reasons used by fraudsters to deceive people are constantly changing. Scammers monitor the news to take advantage of the chaos and current information that can be effective in convincing people to part with their money or vital information. The COVID pandemic, widespread unemployment, the increase in online shopping are just a few examples.

If you add these situations above to historically trusted Medicare / Social Security scams, bogus sweepstakes / lotteries, and bogus charity scams, you’ll get the top five scams of 2021.

1. The unemployment scam – In what is described as the most massive scam opportunity ever, scammers have rushed to exploit the Federal Unemployment Pandemic Assistance (PUA) program. By using bots to file bogus unemployment claims on behalf of real people, fraudsters were able to steal an estimated $ 200 billion from the government program. People who never filed for unemployment received letters telling them that their PUA benefits were expiring. The identities of these people were stolen, and the documents filed also caused serious tax liability issues for those compromised.

We are still getting a lot of calls regarding this scam. If you may have been the victim of the scam, go to the Ohio Department of Employment and Family hotline at 833-658-0394 or online at unemployment.ohio.gov and press “Report Identity Theft” button to report fraud.

2. Social security / Medicare scams – In these scams, victims receive a scary phone call or email claiming to be from Social Security Administration or Medicare stating that there has been suspicious activity on the victim’s account. Victims are told that unless they provide personal information or credit card numbers for the payment of fines, penalties or fees, their account will be suspended.

If you receive any of these scam calls or emails, do not give out any information. Hang up immediately. If you receive a call regarding Social Security, contact the Office of the Inspector General of Social Security online at https://oig.ssa.gov/report.

3. Amazon scam – An “erroneous charge” of $ 499 on a victim’s account would be “detected by Amazon”. In trying to “credit the account” $ 499, $ 3,499 was credited instead. To rectify the “mistake,” the fake Amazon rep said the victim would have to buy $ 3,000 in CVS gift cards and relay the numbers on the back.

Keep in mind: Amazon never asks you to disclose or verify sensitive personal information or offer you a refund that you don’t expect.

4. Sweepstakes / lotteries scam – Often known as the Publishers Clearing House (PCH) scam, victims receive a phone call or email claiming they were the lucky winners of the PCH, or other raffle or lottery. In order to collect their winnings, victims are told that they have to pay an upfront fee in the form of prepaid debit cards or MoneyGram.

Remember, if you didn’t participate, you can’t win it! Don’t buy the Cards or MoneyGram!

5. Pop-up charity scams – Disasters, veterans, and vacations are all reasons Americans generously donate their hard-earned dollars to help those in need. Unfortunately, these reasons are also exploited by crooks who create bogus “pop up” charities to take advantage of well-meaning donors. They mimic real nonprofits by using direct mail, email, and telemarketing tactics to defraud the generous-minded.

Make sure your donations go to legitimate causes by checking with watchdogs like the Better Business Bureau’s Charity Navigator, CharityWatch, and Wise Giving Alliance. Also pay attention to the charity’s name and web addresses. Scammers often imitate the names of familiar and trusted organizations to deceive donors.

These were the top five scams in our region in 2021, but this article is only scratching the surface. Call us at BBB if you come across a situation that you think is suspicious. We can help you!

Reghan Winkler is executive director of the Better Business Bureau serving West Central Ohio. The BBB can be found on the Internet at bbb.org/us/oh/lima.

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Komets: a fake account asking candidates for the purchase of tickets information about their credit card https://howtooccupy.org/komets-a-fake-account-asking-candidates-for-the-purchase-of-tickets-information-about-their-credit-card/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 15:31:34 +0000 https://howtooccupy.org/komets-a-fake-account-asking-candidates-for-the-purchase-of-tickets-information-about-their-credit-card/ [ad_1] Posted: Dec. 30 2021 / 10:31 a.m. EST / Update: Dec. 30 2021 / 11:50 a.m. EST FORT WAYNE, Indiana (WANE) – Scammers have “spoiled” a ticket-giving contest for the Fort Wayne Komets. The team said in a Facebook post that a fake Komets account was contacting the “winners” of a recent ticket contest […]]]>


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Posted:
Update:

FORT WAYNE, Indiana (WANE) – Scammers have “spoiled” a ticket-giving contest for the Fort Wayne Komets.

The team said in a Facebook post that a fake Komets account was contacting the “winners” of a recent ticket contest launched by the team. The account then asked fans for their credit card information, the team said.

“Please do not enter your credit card information for anything related to this contest,” the Komets said. “Real winners will be contacted via message and only asked for a name to leave tickets under Will Call.”

The K’s were donating tickets to their popular New Years Eve game against the Iowa Heartlanders at Memorial Coliseum. Fans were asked to “like” and share the post and identify a friend or family member to bring to the game.

The Komets issued the following statement:

“Last night we were made aware of a potential scam with our Facebook New Years Eve ticket promotion. We quickly took action to resolve the issue and informed our fans that it was indeed a fraud and not to give any information on the link. The organization would certainly never send an electronic form to anyone asking for their personal information. “

To enter the competition, visit the Komets Facebook page.

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